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Psych

  • Regina Miranda, Ph.D. Associate Professor regina.miranda@hunter.cuny.edu Dr. Miranda’s research seeks to understand why young people think about and attempt suicide. Her work focuses on understanding social and cognitive risk for suicide in adolescence and emerging adulthood. Presently, she is conducting an NIH-funded longitudinal study of cognitive predictors of suicidal ideation and behavior among young adults.
  • Sheila Chase, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology, Hunter College schase@hunter.cuny.edu Experimental Psychology

    Current Areas of Research: Our research deals with the manner in which information, primarily visual patterns, are processed, remembered and used as organisms adapt to the challenges of survival.Through extensive work on the food seeking behavior of pigeons we have been able to describe, in quantitative detail, how stimuli reliably associated with motivationally significant outcomes of behavior are isolated from other potentially relevant stimuli and how such stimulus information is processed.

  • James Gordon, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology, Hunter College jgordon@hunter.cuny.edu Biopsychology/Behavioral Neuroscience

    Current Areas of Research: I am interested in the processing of color and form information by the visual system.  Recent work has focused on the nature of the parallel pathways in humans which are responsible for encoding and transmitting this information, and on the development of these pathways from infancy through adulthood.  Psychophysical experiments utilize hue scaling and chromatic adaptation to isolate chromatic and luminance pathways, while physiological studies use the visual evoked potential to study the development of these pathways in humans.

  • Michael J. Lewis, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology, Hunter College mlewis@hunter.cuny.edu Biopsychology/Behavioral Neuroscience

    Current Areas of Research:NEUROBEHAVIORAL LABORATORY
    Dr. Lewis is a behavioral neuroscientist with an interest in the neurobiology of motivation.  He investigates alcohol dependence, eating disorders, and substance abuse.  His current research investigates the role of feeding and nutrition systems in alcohol reinforcement and dependence.
     

  • Thomas Preuss, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Psychology, Hunter College tpreuss@hunter.cuny.edu Biopsychology/Behavioral Neuroscience

    Current Areas of Research:  Research in my lab focuses on mechanistic questions of neural decision-making and plasticity in sensorimotor systems. More specifically, we are studying how the sensory and social environments modify the expression of adaptive behaviors at the level of individual neurons and their networks.

  • Vanya Quinones-Jenab, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology, Hunter College vaquinon@hunter.cuny.edu Biopsychology/Behavioral Neuroscience

    Current Areas of Research:  Our group is trying to understand neurological mechanisms which underlie sex differences in responses to stressors, such as pain and drugs of abuse.  To understand these questions we are using an integrated approach combining molecular, cellular, physiological and behavioral techniques such as in situ histochemistry, RNA solution hybridization, RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, radioimmunoassay, and behavioral monitoring.  Over the past five years at Hunter, we have demonstrated fundamental sex differences in cocaine-induced behavioral effects.

  • Peter Serrano, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Psychology, Hunter College serrano@genectr.hunter.cuny.edu Biopsychology/Behavioral Neuroscience

    Current Areas of Research:  My research interest is to identify how various signaling pathways are affected by stress, fear, developmental insults, pharmacological challenges, neural stimulation and cognition.  There are three projects that reflect these long-standing interests.

  • Michael Siller, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Psychology, Hunter College msiller@hunter.cuny.edu Developmental Psychology

    Current Areas of Research: The initial aim of Dr. Siller's research was to develop a novel measure of parental communication that captures responsive parental behaviors, and also takes into account the unique challenges that parents of young children with autism face during interactions with their children.

  • Mariann Weierich, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Psychology, Hunter College mariann.weierich@hunter.cuny.edu Clinical Psychology and Cognitive Psychology

    Current Research Areas:  Our research focuses on how the brain and the visual system process affective information, and how these processes contribute to anxiety states and disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder. In our lab we use a variety of methods, including computerized experimental tasks modified from vision science, eye-tracking, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to investigate the mechanisms underlying both normative and maladaptive affective processing.